Daily Agenda

Final Program  (Using agenda content available as of June 25, 2016) 

Return to the Compiled Agenda

This agenda is subject to change.

Sunday, July 24:

Subcommittee on Utility Marketplace Access

Location: Broadway F
9:00 a.m. - 9:10 a.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Hon. Nikki Hall, Subcommittee on Utility Marketplace Access Chairwoman and Chair, South Carolina

9:10 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

Update on UMA Toolkit Project

The Supplier Diversity Toolkit was formally launched at the NARUC Annual Meeting in San Francisco. Now, the UMA Committee members will receive a briefing from NUDC on the status of the Toolkit.

Laurie Dowling, Executive Director, National Utilities Diversity Council

9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Demonstrating Value and Leveraging Power through Employee Resource Groups

Though, companies often advertise Employee Resource Groups (“ERG’s”), also called affinity groups, as evidence of their commitment to diversity, the purpose and focus of ERG’s can vary drastically. While some are used to promote diverse retention and promotion and advance one’s career, others are viewed as social clubs with little to no impact on one’s success. This panel will explore the benefits and potential risks of ERG’s and discuss how to successfully implement an ERG that promotes diversity and inclusion and professional development and advancement, while providing tangible value to the company.

Moderator: Sherina Maye Edwards, Commissioner, Illinois

Panelists:
Hon. Colette Honorable, Commissioner, FERC

David Weaver, Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, AGL Resources

Janese Murray, Vice President, Diversity & Inclusion, Exelon

Laura Butler, Vice President, Talent Management & Chief Diversity Officer, PGE

10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

MISO Presentation

10:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Commissioner Discussion – What’s in a Name – Should the Subcommittee recommend new name for the Utility Marketplace Access Subcommittee?

Moderator: Hon. Nikki Hall, Subcommittee on Utility Marketplace Access Chairwoman and Chair, South Carolina

11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

UPDATE: Minority Investment Bank Report
A follow up to a Report delivered at the 2016 NARUC Winter Meeting regarding a national statistical report prepared by Loop Capital Markets on the frequency and level of participation by diverse firms in recent transactions.

Timothy Alan Simon, Com. Emeritus, California Founder TAS STRATEGIES

11:15 a.m.

Subcommittee Business and Closing Remarks

Moderator: Hon. Nikki Hall, Subcommittee on Utility Marketplace Access Chairwoman and Chair, South Carolina

Staff Subcommittee on Consumer Affairs

Location: Cumberland 1                         
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Pricing, Choice, and Customer Communications: Lessons Learned from Other Industries

A guiding principle for regulators is to treat all customers fairly and equally. This often translates into policies that do not reflect divergent consumer priorities or limitations. Grid modernization advances allow collective goals (load shifting, efficiency, operational savings, carbon reduction) to be met by a mix of offerings beneficial to customers that have varied constraints and aspirations.

Research supports the idea that American consumers of all income levels appreciate choices. Many willingly pay premiums for goods and services that provide added value reflecting their priorities while welcoming discounts and loyalty programs. This panel provides insights into the distinct ways diverse customer segments evaluate price incentives including:

  • A new framework for understanding low-income consumer populations based on ability and intention to pay.
  • Marketing strategies predatory businesses use to reach disadvantaged communities and how these same tactics might be applied by utilities in a constructive manner.
  • How popular non-utility industries communicate dynamic pricing and payment options.

The discussion will focus on how these insights are relevant to current challenges facing electric, gas and water utilities and what simple adjustments and innovations could have tremendous positive impact.

Moderator: Phil Boyle, Oregon PUC, Vice-Chair, Subcommittee on Consumer Affairs

Panelists:
Judith Schwartz, To The Point

Nat Treadway, DEFG

View Presentation 

10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

10:00 a.m. - Residential Demand Charges: Ready for Prime Time?

Demand charges have been around for 100 years for commercial and industrial electric customers. Now some utilities think residential ratepayers should pay a demand charge as well. Indeed, in the last two years, utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Wisconsin, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Illinois have proposed them – some via PSC filings and some via legislation or as part of a legislative package. Are such charges appropriate for residential customers?  Can customers respond to them? Are there other rate designs that could better address reducing household customer usage during the utility’s high cost peak period? AARP has been active in the debate in a number of states and will review its efforts to address the interests of household consumers.

Speaker: William Malcolm, Senior Legislative Representative, AARP

View Presentation 

10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Networking Break
10:30 a.m.

Rural Wireless and Consumers on the Ground in the States: New Proposals and Issues

Joint with Staff Subcommittee on Telecommunications in the Telecom meeting room - Broadway A/B

The panel will examine recent proposals for a joint federal-state approach to ensuring that rural wireless consumers have access to broadband networks and services comparable to those in urban areas.  The panel will address broadband adoption in rural and, by extension, urban areas associated with rural broadband deployment.

Moderator: Joe WitmerEsq., Counsel to Chairman Gladys M. Brown, Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission

Panelists:
Hon. Catherine J.K. Sandoval, California

John Evans, Small Business Advocate

Dave LaFluria, Cost Quest Associates

Representative TBA, Utilities Technology Council

Staff Subcommittee on Rate Design

Location: Ballroom E                                    
9:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Agenda TBA

Joint with the Staff Subcommittee on Water

Staff Subcommittee on Water

Location: Ballroom E
9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

The Art of Water Utility Rate Design

(Joint Panel with Staff Subcommittee on Rate Design)

Tiered rates to encourage conservation, allocation of revenue requirement between fixed and commodity rates, and decoupling concepts all present unique challenges and fairness considerations. The panelists will discuss the challenges of water utility rate design and ideas to address those challenges.  

Moderator:  Don Lomoljo, Utilities Hearing Officer, Public Utilities Commission of Nevada

Panelists: 
Jim Busch, Manager - Water and Sewer Department, Missouri Public Service Commission

Anne-Marie Cuneo, Director of Regulatory Operations, Public Utilities Commission of Nevada

Sue Daly, Senior Utilities Specialist, Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

Denise Schmidt, Water Policy Advisor, Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

Staff Subcommittee on Gas

Location: Broadway C/D
9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. 

Vertical Arrangements for Natural Gas Procurement by Utilities.

Over the past few years, utilities and gas producers have given increased attention to long-term commercial commitments under a vertical arrangement to complement their current hedging initiatives that, today, are mostly short term in nature.

This interest in long-term transactions hinges on a variety of factors affecting the U.S. gas market.  Changing conditions in the natural gas market have, again, made long-term commitments appear more palatable and potentially mutually beneficial for both gas producers and utilities.

Presenter: Ken Costello, Principal Researcher, Energy and Environment, National Regulatory Research Institute (NRRI)

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

State/FERC Updates

A discussion of current issues that are addressed in the various States and a presentation of FERC-related matters.

10:50 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

DOE Updates 

Presentation on the major gas-related topics trending at the DOE.

Aliso Canyon Gas Storage National Lab Task Force and CA PUC Regulatory Response

Fossil Energy Methane Emissions Mitigation Research Program and Methane Emissions Quantification Program Solicitation Topic Areas

DOE 2015 LNG Export Study evaluated exports in the range of 12 to 20 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per year

Energy Water Nexus Crosscut and Induced Seismicity from the disposal of produced water  (Post script to the 60 minutes segment)

PresenterChristopher J. Freitas, Program Manager, Natural Gas Infrastructure Research & Development, United States Department of Energy Office of Oil and Natural Gas

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

North American Midstream Infrastructure Through 2035

Presentation on the recently released ICF study reviewing trends (exploration, production, supply) in natural gas and assessing the infrastructure needs through 2035. 

PresenterRichard. R. Hoffmann, Executive Director, The INGAA Foundation Inc.

12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Break

1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

How to Heat a Home?

Joint session with the Staff Subcommittees on Gas, Electric Reliability, and Energy Resources and the Environment - Broadway E

Today's new homes are built to meet more stringent building codes. And today we have new technologies for heating homes as well as new concerns about environmental and safety issues. This panel will explore how homes have changed and the best fuel and technology options for heating them. Panelists will explain what heating technologies are being installed in both single-family and multi-family residences and why, as well as the impact of the 2015 International Energy Code. Finally, speakers will discuss new technologies that are on the horizon for heating our homes in the future.

Moderator: Kim Jones, Chair, NARUC Staff Subcommittee on Electricity

Panelists:
Ron Edelstein, VP of Government Affairs, Gas Technology Institute

Mark Schuling, Consumer Advocate for the State of Iowa

Rafi Sohail, Director of Technical Sales, CenterPoint Energy

Robert Stoyko, VP Marketing and Customer Relations, UGI Utilities, Inc.

Jeremy Susac, Dir. of Government Affairs, Lennar Ventures

Barbara Tyran, Ex. Dir. Government & External Relations, EPRI

Staff Subcommittee on Telecommunications

Location: Broadway A/B
9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Reports by National Representatives

  • FCC
10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Networking Break
10:30 a.m - 12:00 p.m.

Panel III - Joint Panel with Consumer Affairs 

Wireless Broadband Buildout in High Cost Rural Areas - ("We all want what we ain't got" - Jake Owens) 

One of the primary goals of the FCC’s Transformation Order was to get wireless voice and broadband deployment to consumers in rural areas, particularly in areas where the high cost and low density preclude a purely market-driven approach. The FCC created the Mobility Fund I& II to be a permanent ongoing fund to support wireless services to consumers in these areas.  However, the financing and how to achieve deployment have proven to be difficult issues.  While the FCC continues to address this complex topic, stakeholders have recently proposed several novel ways to get wireless service to rural consumers.  The panel will examine this issue, particularly a February 2016 proposal by U.S. Cellular and the role the States could play in getting wireless voice and broadband to rural consumers.

Moderator: Joe Witmer, Pennsylvania

Panelists:
Hon. Catherine J.K. Sandoval, California

John Evans, Advocate, Office of Small Business Advocate, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

David LaFuria, Esq., Lukas, Nace, Gutierrez, & Sachs, Counsel to U.S. Cellular

Michael Oldak, VP of Strategic Initiatives & General Counsel, Utilities Technology Council

12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. Lunch (On Own)
1:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Panel IV:   Cyber Security Update - The State Experience - ("They want what you've got, don't give it to them" - Dirty Harry)

Telecommunications networks and services are at the core of the operations of virtually all commerce, educational, healthcare and other functions in our world today.  Protecting the critical infrastructure from cyber security threats and attacks is paramount to the health, wealth and safety of our nation.  In a telecom environment of mixed jurisdiction and limited market regulation, the role of State commission’s in assuring sound cyber policy and implementation can be complex.  This panel will include an overview by state commission experts on the experiences, successes and issues in commencing telecom cybersecurity initiatives in their State.  They will also highlight their work on and the need for establishing key relationships with State, federal and industry partners, who will also join the panel to share their knowledge, perspective and insight on how best to partner with the States.

Moderator: Hon. Philip Jones, Washington

Panelists:  
David Alexander, Pennsylvania Public Utility Commssion

Sam Mackin, Associate Director for Operations, US Department of Homeland Security

David Furth, Deputy Bureau Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, FCC

Robert Mayer, Vice President - Industry & State Affairs, USTelecom

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. Networking Break
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Panel V:  Non-Geographic Number Portability - Educational Session - (“Here’s my number, so call me maybe” - Carly Rae Jepsen)

As communications networks continue to evolve to a new technological infrastructure, the existing paradigm for number portability must also be examined.  Are we at a point in the evolution where consumers want to and should be able to keep their assigned telephone numbers regardless of where they relocate within the United States? What is the relevance of the Rate Centers associated with the phone number’s origin or the distance between the associated Rate Center and the end user’s physical location in the future?   With this in mind, this panel of technology experts will provide an overview and identify issues on how non-geographic number portability would work, what needs to be done to implement it, and what it looks like when implemented.

Moderator: Carolee Hall, Idaho

Panelists:  
Penn Pfautz, Director, AT&T Global Connection Management

Mary Retka, Director of Network Policy, CenturyLink

Gary Richenaker, Principal Solutions Architect, iconectiv

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Staff Final Resolution Discussion & Disposition

Staff Subcommittee on Pipeline Safety

Location: Music Row 6
1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

(Closed Meeting)

Agenda TBA

Staff Subcommittee on Critical Infrastructure

Location: Broadway G/H                           
10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

CI Subcommittee Closed Meeting

The CI Subcommittee will have a small group, closed meeting to discuss any topics of interest. Invited participants are state and federal regulatory and government entities only. This discussion will be facilitated by Rebecca Beaton, WA UTC.

 

Networking Break (10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.)

 

New Commissioners Forum

Location: Cumberland 2
10:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

New Commissioner Forum and Lunch (Invitees Only)

Washington Action

Location: Music Row 5                                      
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This is a closed meeting. Commissioners and Staff Only.

Committee on Consumer Affairs

Location: Broadway F
1:00 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.

Community Solar Customer Preferences and Customer Protections

Locally-sited, customer supported solar projects - known as "community solar," "shared solar," or "solar gardens" - have become an intriguing new deployment model allowing customers, including low and moderate income customers, to participate in the growth of solar power. This rapidly expanding model creates the opportunity for more deployment of solar energy.

The session will highlight the recent consumer preference research from Smart Electric Power Alliance (SEPA) and the Shelton Group that was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, consumer protection regulations from Maryland’s community solar program, and lessons learned from utilities and third party providers.   State Commissioners will provide an overview of the consumer protection and education tools available, and are there others that might need to be considered.     

Moderator: Hon. Maida J. Coleman, Missouri

Discussion of Current Consumer Protections and Education:
Hon. Tim G. Echols, Georgia

Hon. Gladys M. Brown, Pennsylvania

Panelists:
Dan Chwastyk, Utility Strategy Manager, SEPA  

Paula Carmody, People's Counsel, Maryland Office of People's Counsel

Jeff Cramer, Executive Director, Coalition for Community Solar Access

Carmine A. Tilghman, Senior Director - Energy Supply, UNS Energy

View Presentations 

2:25 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Business Meeting

2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

The Consumer-Centric Utility Model

NRECA will present on its recently released report “The Consumer-Centric Utility Future.”  As the electric utility industry confronts changes in technology, economics, policy and consumer expectations, America’s electric cooperatives offer up the consumer-centric utility (CCU) as a model that will foster innovation for the benefit all energy consumers. Cooperatives believe the consumer-centric utility model, a model that aligns the goals of the utility with the interests of consumers, both promotes innovation and mitigates the risks that come with rapid change.  When co-ops and other utilities adhere to a consumer-centric utility model, they thrive by meeting and exceeding their consumers’ expectations, leveraging new technologies, offering new services and ensuring affordable, reliable power.

Speaker: Jan Ahlen, Senior Regulatory Affairs Specialist, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

View Presentation 

Committee on Consumer Affairs

Location: Broadway F
1:00 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.

Community Solar Customer Preferences and Customer Protections

Locally-sited, customer supported solar projects - known as "community solar," "shared solar," or "solar gardens" - have become an intriguing new deployment model allowing customers, including low and moderate income customers, to participate in the growth of solar power. This rapidly expanding model creates the opportunity for more deployment of solar energy.

The session will highlight the recent consumer preference research from Smart Electric Power Alliance (SEPA) and the Shelton Group that was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, consumer protection regulations from Maryland’s community solar program, and lessons learned from utilities and third party providers.   State Commissioners will provide an overview of the consumer protection and education tools available, and are there others that might need to be considered.     

Moderator: Hon. Maida J. Coleman, Missouri

Discussion of Current Consumer Protections and Education:
Hon. Tim G. Echols, Georgia

Hon. Gladys M. Brown, Pennsylvania

Panelists:
Dan Chwastyk, Utility Strategy Manager, SEPA  

Paula Carmody, People's Counsel, Maryland Office of People's Counsel

Jeff Cramer, Executive Director, Coalition for Community Solar Access

Carmine A. Tilghman, Senior Director - Energy Supply, UNS Energy

View Presentations 

2:25 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Business Meeting

2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

The Consumer-Centric Utility Model

NRECA will present on its recently released report “The Consumer-Centric Utility Future.”  As the electric utility industry confronts changes in technology, economics, policy and consumer expectations, America’s electric cooperatives offer up the consumer-centric utility (CCU) as a model that will foster innovation for the benefit all energy consumers. Cooperatives believe the consumer-centric utility model, a model that aligns the goals of the utility with the interests of consumers, both promotes innovation and mitigates the risks that come with rapid change.  When co-ops and other utilities adhere to a consumer-centric utility model, they thrive by meeting and exceeding their consumers’ expectations, leveraging new technologies, offering new services and ensuring affordable, reliable power.

Speaker: Jan Ahlen, Senior Regulatory Affairs Specialist, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

View Presentation 

Subcommittee on Pipeline Safety

Location: Music Row 6
1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

(Closed Meeting)

Agenda TBA

Committee on Critical Infrastructure

Location: Broadway G/H                             
1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.

Introductions by the Hon. Richard Mroz, New Jersey (Chair, Committee on Critical Infrastructure)

1:15 p.m. - 1:35 p.m. 

Updates from Federal Partners

Speakers:
Bill Cummins, Energy and Transportation Sector Liaison, U.S. DHS

Matt Duncan, Program Manager, U.S. DOE

1:35 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.

International Cybersecurity Challenges: Implications for U.S. Public Utilities and their Regulators

Panelists will discuss global cybersecurity threats affecting public utilities in the United States and other countries. Among the topics included are the sources and nature of international threats to U.S. public utilities; lessons learned from the Ukrainian penetration; the United Kingdom's regulatory structure and its cybersecurity defense capabilities; and finally a review of cyber threat management in other countries.

 

Moderator: Hon. Arthur House, Chairman, Connecticut

Speakers:
Paul Stockton, Managing Director, Sonecon LLC

Bill Bryan, President, ValueBridge International, Inc.

Eric Slavinsky, CIO, PPL Corporation

3:05 p.m. - 3:15 p.m. 

Break

3:15 p.m. - 3:35 p.m.

Briefing on EPRI's Recently Launched EMP Program

In this briefing, EPRI will outline its recently-launched EMP initiative, progress to date, and plans for the future. Electromagnetic radiation is a growing concern in the energy business. It can include intentional events -- such as weaponized electromagnetic pulse (EMP) or intentional electromagnetic interference -- or natural events, such as geomagnetic disturbances (GMD) from solar flares. While the industry has worked to develop an effective response to GMD, less work has been centered on the effects of an EMP attack.  EPRI is collaborating with electric utilities and the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a response to EMP threats.  The intention of EPRI’s research on EMP is to provide a sound, technical basis from which utilities can effectively evaluate potential impacts, mitigation, and recovery plans.

This three-year collaborative effort will:

  1. Characterize specific EMP threats;
  2. Assess substation component vulnerability;
  3. Assess methodologies for determining system impact; and
  4. Assess and develop mitigation strategies including hardening and recovery to enable utilities to make important decisions about system resiliency.

Speaker: Rob Manning, EPRI Vice President of Transmission, EPRI

Presentation Resources:

3:35 p.m. - 4:40 p.m.

Grid Resiliency and Physical Security

The North American bulk electric power grid is one of the most complex technological networks in the world. Recent events highlight that this interconnected network is encountering a new range of threats. In the event of large-scale and widespread damage to the US transmission infrastructure, restoration of the grid could be hampered by long lead times required to build and deliver critical replacement equipment including large power transformers, circuit breakers and other specialized electrical equipment. Consumers benefit from opportunities that allow for economical access to critical equipment faster than traditionally possible. This session will explore areas where state and federal regulators and industry can and are working together to encourage, facilitate, and leverage actions taking place in the utility space to support a more resilient transmission grid.  This panel aims to educate attendees on challenges and potential solutions in creating a more resilient grid.

Moderator: Hon. Philip Jones, WA UTC

Speakers:
Michael Deggendorf, CEO, Grid Assurance

TBA, North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 

Petter Fiskerud, Program Manager, ABB Consulting 

 4:45 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Business Meeting

 

Staff Subcommittee on Information Services

Location: Cumberland 1
The Staff Subcommittee on Information Services (SSIS) will not convene until the morning of Monday, July 25. Early arrival SSIS members are invited to attend the session below.            
1:00 p.m.

Critical Infrastructure Subcommittee, Topic TBA

Telecommunications Act Modernization

Location: Music Row 5
1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Agenda TBA

Staff Subcommittee on Energy Resources and the Environment

Location: Ballroom E
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

How to Heat a Home?

Joint session with the Staff Subcommittees on Gas, Electricity and Electric Reliability.

 

Networking Break (2:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

 

Committee on International Relations

Location: Broadway G/H                         
1:35 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.

International Cybersecurity Challenges: Implications for U.S. Public Utilities and their Regulators
 

Joint meeting with Committee on Critical Infrastructure.

Panelists will discuss global cybersecurity threats affecting public utilities in the United States and other countries. Among the topics included are the sources and nature of international threats to U.S. public utilities; lessons learned from the Ukrainian penetration; the United Kingdom's regulatory structure and its cybersecurity defense capabilities; and finally a review of cyber threat management in other countries.

Moderator: Hon. Arthur House, Connecticut

Speakers:
Paul Stockton, Managing Director, Sonecon LLC

Bill Bryan, President, ValueBridge International, Inc.

Eric Slavinsky, CIO, PPL Corporation

3:45p.m. - 4:45 pm

United States Natural Gas Exports (specifically Liquefied Natural Gas) –The Implications for the Economy, Trade and Geopolitics

Joint meeting with the Committee on Gas - Broadway F

The United States shale gas boom has provided new prospects for the energy future. With the shale gas “revolution,” natural gas prices have reached historic lows in recent years due to a surge in production. Low prices have sparked a debate within the United States about what to do with this glut of supply. Moreover, high prices for LNG in Europe and Asia create an opportunity for the United States. In fact while traditionally the United States was seen as a net energy importer the United States is poised to be in the foreseeable future to net energy exporter.  Prudent and responsible processes and policies with regards to natural gas exports must consider the impact of exports on the national and regional economy, job creation, international trade flows, and the environment. This panel will take a critical look at the export debate, the domestic policies surrounding this debate and the geopolitical implications of global shale gas development.

Moderator: Hon. Diane X. Burman, New York

Panelists:

Hon. Jolette Westbrook, Massachuestts

Hon. Robert Pickett, Alaska 

Sarah Ladislaw, Director and Senior Fellow, Energy and National Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies 

William Hederman, Senior Advisor, DOE 

LNG Producer TBD

4:45 pm - 5 p.m.

Committee on International Relations Business Meeting

Moderator: Hon. Anne Hoskins, Maryland

Approval of Minutes of Winter Meeting

Resolutions

NARUC International Staff Report, Erin Hammel, NARUC staff

 

Task Force on Transportation

Location: Broadway C/D                                     

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

 

 

The States of Rail Safety: State Involvement in Railroad Safety Issues?

Leaders in railroad safety issues from the Federal Railroad Administration, the States of California and Illinois, and BNSF Railway discuss their views on the role of States in railroad safety issues, as well as several current federal rulemakings and studies involving notification to States, railroad liability for hazardous materials, and emergency response planning.

Moderator: Hon. Ann Rendahl, Washington

Panelists:
Robert Lauby, Associate Administrator for Safety, Federal Railroad Administration

Patrick Brady, General Director Hazardous Materials Safety, BNSF Railway

Paul King, California

Joseph Klinger, Assistant Director, Illinois Emergency Management Agency

View Presentations 

4:00 p.m. - 4:10 p.m.

Break

4:10 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.

Business Meeting

Welcome

Moderator: Hon. Ann Rendahl, Washington

4:20 p.m. - 4:40 p.m. Working Group on Motor Carriers
4:40 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Working Group on Rail Safety

Staff Subcommittee on Electricity

Location: Broadway E                       
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

How to Heat a Home?

(Joint session with the Staff Subcommittees on Gas, Electric Reliability, and Energy Resources and the Environment.)

Today's new homes are built to meet more stringent building codes. And today we have new technologies for heating homes as well as new concerns about environmental and safety issues. This panel will explore how homes have changed and the best fuel and technology options for heating them. Panelists will explain what heating technologies are being installed in both single-family and multi-family residences and why, as well as the impact of the 2015 International Energy Code. Finally, speakers will discuss new technologies that are on the horizon for heating our homes in the future.

Moderator: Kim Jones, Chair, NARUC Staff Subcommittee on Electricity

Panelists:
Ron Edelstein, VP of Government Affairs, Gas Technology Institute

Mark Schuling, Consumer Advocate for the State of Iowa

Rafi Sohail, Director of Technical Sales, CenterPoint Energy

Robert Stoyko, VP Marketing and Customer Relations, UGI Utilities, Inc.

Jeremy Susac, Dir. of Government Affairs, Lennar Ventures

Barbara Tyran, Ex. Dir. Government & External Relations, EPRI

View Presentations 

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

Case Study: Integrated Forecasting of Weather, Customer Load, and Intermittent Generation Output

(Joint session with the Staff Subcommittee on Electric Reliability.)

Vermont Electric Power Company (VELCO) has worked with IBM to develop software that combines highly localized weather and load information to better forecast both load and intermittent resources.

Moderator: Pat Poli, Chair, NARUC Staff Sub. on Electric Reliability

Speaker: Kerrick Johnson, VP of Strategy & Communication, VELCO

View Presentations 

3:15 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

NERC's Short-Term Special Assessment: Operational Risk with increasing Gas-Electric Interdependencies

(Joint session with the Staff Subcommittee on Electric Reliability.)

NERC recently completed a special assessment of reliability impacts due to increasing dependence of natural gas-fueled electric generation.  Four geographic areas were targeted for evaluated: ISO-NE; NYISO; ERCOT and WECC-CA/MX (Aliso Canyon region.)  Hear the findings and recommendations, as well as insights gleaned from the Aliso Canyon storage facility leak and the increasing risks to reliability from diminished diversity in fuel type and source.     

Moderator: Pat Poli, Chair, NARUC Staff Sub. on Electric Reliability

Speaker: John Moura, Director of Reliability Assessment & System Analysis, NERC

View Presentations 

3:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Networking Break
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Discussion: The loss of the Aliso Canyon Storage Facility and the subsequent scramble to maintain reliability of the bulk electric system.  

(Joint session with the Staff Subcommittee on Electric Reliability.)

What to do when you unexpectedly lose more than 80 Bcf of natural gas capacity necessary to provide just-in-time fuel deliveries to 18 large electric power plants in the Los Angeles basin, just months before the summer heat wave begins?   The answer: Everything you can think of!  

Hear the details from Commissioner Catherine Sandoval.

Moderators:
Kim Jones, Chair, NARUC Staff Sub. on Electricity

Pat Poli, Chair, NARUC Staff Sub. on Electric Reliability

Speakers:
Hon. Catherine Sandoval, California

TBD, Southern California Edison

Committee on Gas

Location: Broadway F                        
3:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m. 

United States Natural Gas Exports (specifically Liquefied Natural Gas) –The Implications for the Economy, Trade and Geopolitics

Joint Panel with the International and Gas Committees 

The United States shale gas boom has provided new prospects for the energy future. With the shale gas “revolution,” natural gas prices have reached historic lows in recent years due to a surge in production. Low prices have sparked a debate within the United States about what to do with this glut of supply. Moreover, high prices for LNG in Europe and Asia create an opportunity for the United States. In fact while traditionally the United States was seen as a net energy importer the United States is poised to be in the foreseeable future to net energy exporter.  Prudent and responsible processes and policies with regards to natural gas exports must consider the impact of exports on the national and regional economy, job creation, international trade flows, and the environment. This panel will take a critical look at the export debate, the domestic policies surrounding this debate and the geopolitical implications of global shale gas development.

Moderator: Hon. Diane X. Burman, New York

Panelists:
Sarah Ladislaw, Director and Senior Fellow, Energy and National Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies 

William Hederman, Senior Advisor, DOE 

Hon. Jolette Westbrook, Massachusetts

Hon. Robert Pickett, Alaska 

Charlie Riedl, executive Director, Center for Liquefied Natural Gas

 

 

Networking Break (3:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.)

 

Welcome Reception (5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.)

Location: TBD