Winter Policy Summit logo

February 10-13, 2019 • Renaissance Washington Hotel • Washington, D.C.

Winter Policy Summit logo

February 10-13, 2019
Renaissance Washington Hotel
Washington, D.C.

Staff Subcommittee on Clean Coal and Carbon Management

Sunday

3:45 - 5:00 p.m. • Meeting Room 2

3:45 - 5:00

Overview of Cost and Performance Estimates for Greenfield and retrofit Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Systems

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), conducts and administers a broad research and development (R&D) program aimed at producing competitively-priced electric power with a focus on improving efficiency, increasing plant availability, reducing cooling water requirements, and achieving ultra-low emissions.  The Carbon Capture program aims to accomplish these goals while capturing carbon dioxide from coal-fired power plants.  In order to ascertain the effectiveness of R&D and determine progress toward program goals, NETL has developed a series of baseline cases to enable accurate comparison of R&D technologies to state-of-the-art systems.  These baselines include carbon capture cost and performance estimates, in addition to estimates for the base power plant, using systems available from vendors for introductory commercial application in both greenfield and retrofit applications.  This presentation will provide an overview of NETL’s estimates for coal and natural gas power plants, both with and without carbon capture.  Additionally, information will be provided on analyses and tools developed to assess the costs for carbon capture retrofits.

Speaker: 

Timothy Fout, Engineer, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Energy Process Analysis Team

 

Expanding the U.S. Coal Value Chain: An Overview of the U.S. DOE Coal Beneficiation Program

Over 90% of the coal produced in the U.S. is used to generate electricity. However, this market has declined in recent years. To continue to extract the full economic value from our Nation’s coal resources, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), though its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), initiated a Coal Beneficiation Program in April 2018.

The Coal Beneficiation Program is focused on developing new high-value products derived from coal, enhancing the value of coal as a feedstock and improving available coal property databases.  High-value carbon products such as carbon fiber, carbon nanomaterials and carbon additives for cements and structural composites represent new business opportunities in unconventional industries for coal. Enhancing the value of coal as a feedstock will increase traditional domestic and global markets for U.S. coal in power generation and steelmaking, while expanding existing coal property databases informs potential consumers in both domestic and global markets on the extraordinary value of U.S. coal resources.

This presentation will provide an overview of the DOE Coal Beneficiation Program, including a look at some of the initial projects that have been awarded.

Speaker: 

Anthony Zinn, Engineer, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Enabling Technologies & Partnerships Team