Summer Policy Summit logo

July 21-24, 2019
JW Marriott Indianapolis
Indianapolis, Indiana

Agenda

Saturday

Staff Subcommittee on Telecommunications

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 1 & 2

9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

STATE STAFF SESSION

(Closed Session for State Commissioners and State Staff)

Joe Witmer, Pennsylvania, Acting Chairperson

Greg Doyle, Minnesota, Vice Chairperson

Brad Ramsay, NARUC Staff

Ken Mallory, NARUC Staff

Ashley Ingebrigtsen, NARUC Staff 

Sherry Lichtenberg, NRRI Staff  Lead

9:00 - 9:45

NARUC Update:  Regulatory and Legislative

Brad Ramsay and Ken Mallory 

9:45 - 10:00

NRRI: Current and Future Projects

Sherry Lichtenberg

10:00 - 10:15

Joint Boards Update

Separations

Sandy Reams, Joe Witmer

Universal Service

Labros Pilalus

10:15 - 10:30 Break

10:30 - 11:00

USAC Update

Michelle Garber 

11:00 - 11:30

STATE DEVELOPMENTS ROUNDTABLE

Members

11:30 - 12:00

Emerging Issues In The States

1:30-2:30 p.m.

Robocalling Wars - Chapter B (for Blocking)

As the industry moves toward wide-scale call authentication, the FCC for the first time permits default call blocking based on "any reasonable analytics, designed to identify unwanted calls."  How will this fundamental change ensure that the right calls are completed, that consumers can rely on a consistent implementation, will there be a cost to consumers and will  rural call completion suffer? These and other challenges to fixing the robocall problem will be discussed.

Moderator:

Robert McCausland, VP Regulatory & Government Affairs, West Telecom Services, LLC 

Dave Bergmann, NASUCA (invited)

2:30-2:45 p.m.

Networking Break

2:45-3:45 p.m.

Resolutions

3:45-4:00 p.m.

Next Steps to November

4:00-5:00 p.m. Resolutions (as needed)

Subcommittee and Staff Subcommittee on Education and Research

12:00-2:50 p.m. • Room 314

12:00-1:00 p.m.

Closed Executive Session

1:00-1:05 p.m.

Welcome and Introductions

Hon. John (Butch) Howard, Chair, South Carolina

1:05-1:00 p.m.

Approval of Minutes

1:10-1:20 p.m.

NARUC Center for Partnerships & Innovation Update

Danielle Byrnett, Director, NARUC Center for Partnerships & Innovation

1:20-1:30 p.m.

NRRI Update

Carl Pechman, Executive Director

1:30-1:35 p.m.

ICER and Other Matters

Jack Betkoski, III, Connecticut

1:35-1:55 p.m.

Annual Reports

  • Ted Kury, Director of Energy Studies, Public Utility Research Center, FL
  • Sarah Gott, Financial Research Institute, MU
  • Doug Gegax, Director, Center for Public Utilities, NMSU
  • Lori Sak, Director, WI Public Utility Institute, UW-Madison
1:55-2:10 p.m.

Update on Subcommittee Projects

Erin Hammel, Director, International Programs, NARUC

  • 2019 Summer Internships (NARUC)
  • New Commissioner Regulatory Orientation
  • Other
2:10-2:20 p.m.

Review of Applications for Support

Erin Hammel, Director, International Programs, NARUC

  • Applications for Consideration
2:20-2:30 p.m.

Update on Staff Subcommittee Projects

Patti Lucarelli, Chair, Staff Subcommittee, RI

  • Survey on Training Needs
  • Scholarship Report and Awardee Selection
2:30 p.m.

Rate School Report

Cathy Pedemonti, CT, Rate School Coordinator

2:40 p.m.

New Business

 

Executive Committee

(Closed Meeting)

3:00-5:00 p.m. • Room 313

Sunday

NRRI Board of Directors Meeting

(Closed Meeting)

7:30-8:45 a.m. • Room 312

Registration Open

8:00 a.m.-6:30 p.m. • Foyer

Volunteer Training Breakfast

(Invitees Only)

8:00-9:45 a.m. • Room 309 & 310

New Commissioner Forum & Breakfast

(New Commissioners Only)

8:30-9:45 a.m. • Room 314

Staff Subcommittee on Critical Infrastructure

(Closed Meeting)

9:00-11:45 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 5

 

 

Committee on Consumers and the Public Interest presents:

Poverty Simulation: What Roles Do and Can Regulators Play?

9:45-11:59 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 6

This unique event is an activity in which participants have the opportunity to experience some of the challenges facing low-income consumers and other vulnerable populations. Participants will be assigned the role of a "family member" and encounter obstacles as they go about their day trying to pay bills and deal with routine responsibilities. Participants must fully participate in the full two-hour simulation for results to be accurate.

Objectives of this poverty simulation include:

  • Exploring factors impacting consumer decisions related to utility payments
  • Increasing understanding about the numerous challenges and dueling priorities facing low-income consumers and vulnerable populations
  • Identifying specific ways Commissions, utilities, and consumer advocates can collaborate to address these challenges as they relate to the affordability of utilities

Participants must be registered for the Summer Policy Summit and must commit to the full 2-hour session.

Register for the Poverty Simulation

 

 

Staff Subcommittee on Energy Resources and the Environment

Participating in the Poverty Simulation

9:45-11:59 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 6

Staff Subcommittee on Rate Design

Participating in the Poverty Simulation

9:45-11:59 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 6

Staff Subcommittee on Consumers and the Public Interest

Participating in the Poverty Simulation

9:45-11:59 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 6

Staff Subcommittee on Information Services

9:45-11:59 a.m. • Participating in the Poverty Simulation • Grand Ballroom 6

3:00-5:00 p.m. • Joint with Staff Subcommittee on Executive Management • Room 312

Staff Subcommittee on Telecommunications

9:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

9:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m. • Participating in the Poverty Simulation • Grand Ballroom 6

12:30-5:00 p.m. • Participating in the Black Sky Exercise • Grand Ballroom 5

Staff Subcommittee on Water

Participating in the Poverty Simulation

9:45-11:59 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 6

Staff Subcommittee on Gas

9:45 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

9:45-11:59 a.m. • Participating in the Poverty Simulation • Grand Ballroom 6

1:00-2:00 p.m. • Joint with Committee on International Relations • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4

 

 

 

Networking Break

10:15-10:30 a.m. • Foyer

Committee on Critical Infrastructure presents:

Black Sky Exercise

12:30-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 5

Extreme, multi-regional “Black Sky” hazards—from severe weather to rapidly escalating cyber attacks—have the potential to disrupt essential lifeline services that put our Nation’s citizens in peril. Interdependencies of critical infrastructures and their supply chains magnify the disruptive effects. Exceptional levels of cross-sector collaboration are necessary to build resilience to these hazards.

This Black Sky Exercise is intended to introduce participants to the scale and scope of coordination and collaboration required across federal, state, and local governments, relief agencies, and private sector organizations to plan for and recover from large-scale, multi-sector, disruptions. The focus will be on the role of state public utility commissions before, during, and after a Black Sky event.

EIS Council, a world-recognized leader in Black Sky resilience planning, communications, and training, will facilitate discussion and interaction by participants to produce insights and lessons learned.

Participants must be registered for the Summer Policy Summit and must commit to the full 4.5-hour session.

Participants will be placed in teams and notified of pre-work assignments prior to arriving in Indianapolis.

Register for the Black Sky Workshop

 

 

Staff Subcommittee on Clean Coal

1:00-2:00 p.m. • Joint with International Relations • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4

Committee on International Relations

12:30-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4

12:30-1:00 p.m.

Welcome

Hon. David Morton  – Co-Vice Chair, IRC – British Columbia UC

Business Meeting

Hon. David Morton  – Co-Vice Chair, IRC – British Columbia UC

  • Introductions
  • Approval of winter meeting minutes
  • Resolutions
  • Call for nominations – Terry Barnich Award

Report on NARUC International Activities

Erin Hammel – Director, International Department, NARUC

1:00-2:00 p.m.

Carbon Capture on the Global Stage 

(joint session with Staff Subcommittee on Clean Coal & Carbon Management)

Carbon capture and sequestration may represent the only way forward for coal in a carbon-limited world. CCS faces formidable constraints in both economics and technology. This session will examine how the United Kingdom and others are working to address those challenges.

Moderators:

Hon. Kara Fornstrom, Wyoming 

Hon. Brian Kroshus, North Dakota 

Panelists: 

Patricia Loria, Senior Client Engagement Lead, Global CCS Institute

Frank Morton, Director, Technology Development, National Carbon Capture Center

2:00-3:00 p.m.

The Japanese Energy Picture – A U.S. Perspective

With an advanced industrial economy and a population of almost 130 million, Japan faces considerable challenges in meeting its energy needs. Severely limited with few energy resources of its own, it depends largely on nuclear energy and coal and natural gas imports. However, the public’s appetite for nuclear has sharply declined following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear plant accident, hampering the country’s ability to restart much of its current fleet. It remains committed to meeting its carbon reduction pledges under the Paris agreement, but its recently approved Strategic Energy Plan calls for reliance on nuclear for a quarter of its needs, and coal and natural gas for half, by 2030. Last March, the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a delegation of state commissioners and federal officials to meet with U.S. and Japanese government officials, industry representatives, and energy policy experts to understand the Japanese energy picture, its energy strategy, the technology advances in reducing carbon emissions from coal, and the role of U.S. trade, investment, and policy in helping Japan meet its energy goals. At this panel, delegation members will share their insights from the trip and present an overview of the Japanese energy landscape, with emphasis on the U.S.’s role. 

Moderator: Hon. James Huston – Indiana URC

Panelists:  

Hon. Nick Wagner – NARUC President – Iowa UB

Louis Hrkman - Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Clean Coal and Carbon Management, US DOE

Robert Gee - President, Gee Strategies Group, LLC 

3:00-3:20 p.m.

Networking Break

3:20-4:20 p.m.

Another Nexus: Electricity and Public Health Sub-Saharan Africa

Electrification is commonly thought of in terms of economic development. But access to electricity, or a lack of access, has other profound societal impacts. Not the least of those is public health. Professor Abigail Mechtenberg’s research has included an examination of how unreliable electric service affects public health in African nations and the potential of microgrids to alleviate the problem. She will discuss that work and the larger question of what type of electrification is most effective in addressing public health needs.

Moderator: Hon. David Morton  – Co-Vice Chair, IRC – British Columbia UC

Panelist: Abigail Mechtenberg, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame

4:20- 5:00 p.m.

Open discussion

Subcommittee on Pipeline Safety

(Closed Meeting)

1:30-3:30 p.m. • Room 313

 

 

Staff Subcommittee on Pipeline Safety

(Closed Meeting)

1:30-3:30 p.m. • Room 313

 

 

Networking Break

2:45-3:45 p.m. • Foyer

Subcommittee on Nuclear Issues-Waste Disposal

(Invitees Only)

3:30-5:00 p.m. • Room 314

 

 

Staff Subcommittee on Nuclear Issues-Waste Disposal

(Invitees Only)

3:30-5:00 p.m. • Room 314

 

 

Staff Subcommittee on Executive Management

(For Commission Staff Only)

3:00-5:00 p.m. • Room 312

 

 

Subcommittee on Supplier and Workforce Diversity

3:00-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 9 & 10

3:00-3:30 p.m.

Business Meeting

3:30-4:30 p.m.

Navigating Your Way Up the Pipeline

Diversity and inclusion efforts continue to be made on almost every level within the utility industry. To that end, many states have created on-the-job training programs that teach the newest generation how to achieve the skills they need to succeed in their vocation. The value of diversity is well recognized within this industry, but it is widely known that women, African-Americans, Hispanics, veterans, and other minorities hold few leadership positions across the country. Like in other industries, the escalating retirement of baby boomers is causing a significant gap in the workforce; as such, today’s energy leaders in both the public and private sectors must invest in the development of millennials, whom by 2030 will make up 75% of the workforce.  Proactive efforts in developing the next era of energy leaders will ensure the bright future of our power system and the critical preservation of institutional memory. As the saying goes: everyone has to start somewhere…but how do you end up where you want to go? This panel will delve into what needs to be done to build the pipeline the next era needs and what should be done to build the next generation of minority leaders in this industry.

Moderator: Hon. Sadzi M. Oliva, Illinois

Panelists:

Hon. Andrew Fay, Florida

Dr. Antonio Flores, President & CEO, Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities

Dwayne Pickett, Director, Regulatory Affairs, ComEd

Gerardo Delgado, Legal & Policy Advisor, Illinois Commerce Commission

Terri Oliva, Executive Director, Human Resources and Assistant Treasurer, Edison Electric Institute

4:30-5:00 p.m.  

Welcome Reception

(Tickets Required)

5:00-6:30 p.m. • TBD / Griffin / Foyer / Grand Ballroom 5

Monday

OPSI Breakfast Meeting

(Invitees Only)

7:00-8:45 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 9

Washington Action

(Members Only)

7:30-8:45 a.m. • Room 314

Registration Open

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Foyer

General Session

9:00-10:15 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 5

 

Delivering More than Electrons!

A One-On-One Chat with Lynn Good, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Duke Energy and Edison Electric Institute Chairman 2018-2019

 

News You Can Use: The President’s Press Conference

How is NARUC helping to make utility regulation great? What are the priorities and key issues facing regulators today? What are the stories and sound bites that didn’t make the news? Find out during President Wagner’s ‘press conference,’ which will highlight NARUC’s advocacy agenda, clarify positions, and take questions from the audience. So, raise your hand and learn how NARUC is raising the bar to advance state utility regulation.

Networking Break

10:15-10:45 a.m. • Foyer

Committee on Consumers and the Public Interest

(Joint Meetings)

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4

1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. 

Finding Clean Energy Solutions for Low-Moderate Income (LMI) Communities: The Crucial Role of Policymakers in Closing the LMI Energy Technology Gap and Listening to the Consumer Voice (joint with Committee on Gas and Subcommittee on Supplier and Workforce Diversity)

Part 1 of 2

This panel will help examine how to protect low and moderate  income (LMI) households from potential adverse consequences of new technologies. No one can benefit from energy savings more than LMI customers, who often pay a much higher portion of their income for energy than middle- and high-income consumers. LMI communities and consumers can be subject to challenges when trying to access new technologies and examine what are the technologies true economic benefits.

Regulators grapple with the proper role of the regulated utility in serving the LMI community with new and emerging technologies. In fact, regulators have a long history of striving to ensure underserved communities get fair access to and are afforded the full benefits of the energy grid regardless of economic wherewithal. This panel will explore best practices and lessons learned in these endeavors in seeking to increase the disproportionately low deployment of new and emerging technologies in the LMI community. The focus is on truly engaging in a dialogue on roles regulators can play in better serving this sector.

NOTE: This is a two-part panel discussion featuring opportunities for the panelists to showcase and demonstrate technology case studies and help foster partnerships across energy sectors to engage with the LMI community. 

Co-moderators: 

Hon. Maida Coleman, Missouri

Hon. Sadzi Oliva, Illinois

Panelists: 

Joseph Dominguez, CEO, COmEd

Joe Hampton, President, Spire

Sandra Mattavous-Frye, People's Counsel, District of Columbia Office of the People's Counsel

Jerrold Oppenheim, President and Founder, Democracy and Regulation

Judith Schwartz, President and Founder, To the Point

Suzanne Sitherwood, CEO, Spire Energy

2:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m. 

Finding Clean Energy Solutions for Low-Moderate Income (LMI) Communities: The Crucial Role of Policymakers in Closing the LMI Energy Technology Gap and Listening to the Consumer Voice (joint with Committee on Gas and Subcommittee on Supplier and Workforce Diversity)

Part 2 of 2

This panel will help examine how to protect low and moderate  income (LMI) households from potential adverse consequences of new technologies. No one can benefit from energy savings more than LMI customers, who often pay a much higher portion of their income for energy than middle- and high-income consumers. LMI communities and consumers can be subject to challenges when trying to access new technologies and examine what are the technologies true economic benefits.

Regulators grapple with the proper role of the regulated utility in serving the LMI community with new and emerging technologies. In fact, regulators have a long history of striving to ensure underserved communities get fair access to and are afforded the full benefits of the energy grid regardless of economic wherewithal. This panel will explore best practices and lessons learned in these endeavors in seeking to increase the disproportionately low deployment of new and emerging technologies in the LMI community. The focus is on truly engaging in a dialogue on roles regulators can play in better serving this sector.

NOTE: This is a two-part panel discussion featuring opportunities for the panelists to showcase and demonstrate technology case studies and help foster partnerships across energy sectors to engage with the LMI community. 

Co-moderators: 

Hon. Maida Coleman, Missouri

Hon. Sadzi Oliva, Illinois

Panelists: 

Corey Capasso, Founder and CEO, Urbint

Joseph Dominguez, CEO, COmEd

Joe Hampton, President, Spire

Sandra Mattavous-Frye, People's Counsel, District of Columbia Office of the People's Counsel

Jerrold Oppenheim, President and Founder, Democracy and Regulation

Judith Schwartz, President and Founder, To the Point

4:00 p.m-5:00 p.m.

The Affordability Challenge – Customer Assistance Programs (CAP) (Joint with the Committee on Water)

Despite water service’s historic undervaluation, some customers still struggle to afford water. Affordability issues are likely to rise to the forefront as costs increase to address critical infrastructure replacement and safe water quality requirements. This panel will examine affordability policies such as low-income tariffs along with any issues that impede such policies from being implemented.

Moderator: TBA 

Panelists: 

Larry Dickerman, Senior Director Public Policy, Landis + Gyr

Jeff Hughes, Teaching Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Additional panelists TBA

Committee on Electricity

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 6

10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

(Trans)Mission Critical? Reconsidering FERC’s Electric Transmission Incentives   

Section 219 of the Federal Power Act required FERC to establish, by rule, electric transmission rate incentives for the purpose of benefiting customers by ensuring reliability and reducing the cost of delivered power.  On March 21, 2019, FERC opened an inquiry into its existing incentives policy, which was promulgated in 2006 and refined in 2012.   Initial comments were filed on June 26 and reply comments are due August 26.  Our panelists will discuss FERC’s existing policy and potential improvements, and will address questions raised by FERC on a topic that Chairman Chatterjee has described as “critical to ensuring that the energy revolution we’re currently undergoing results in more reliable services and lower prices for customers.” 

Moderator:

Hon. Judith Williams Jagdmann, Virginia

Speakers:  

Phil Moeller, Executive VP, Business Operations Group and Regulatory Affair, EEI

Suedeen Kelly, Partner, Jenner & Block LLP

Delia Patterson, General Counsel and SVP of Policy Analysis, APPA

1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

100% Clean Energy: What Comes Next for Regulators?

(Joint with Committee on Energy Resources & the Environment)

More and more States, cities, utilities, and corporations are passing laws and setting targets and goals for achieving "100%" clean, carbon-free, or renewable energy as the long-term expectation for meeting electricity needs. This panel will seek to describe the trend and begin to explore implications for regulators, including:

  • Where and why is this trend occurring?
  • What are the common elements and differences across the "100%" goals and policies?
  • How do the policies consider and impact costs, rate regulation and regulatory process?

Moderator:

Leia Guccione, Principal, Electricity Program, Rocky Mountain Institute

Speakers:

Hon. James Griffin, Hawaii Public Utilities Commission 

Sandra Mattavous-Frye, People's Counsel, DC Office of the People’s Counsel

Jeff Lyng, Director of Energy & Environmental Policy, Xcel Energy 

2:45 - 3:45 p.m.

100% Clean Energy: What Comes Next for Markets and the Grid?

(Joint with Committee on Energy Resources & the Environment)

Many States have developed aggressive targets for renewable and carbon-free energy resource procurement while retiring legacy generation. This panel will begin to explore implications for markets and the grid, including:

  • What are the challenges for States, cities, and utilities getting to 100%?
  • How do solutions vary across regions, resources, and regulatory and market structures?
  • To what extent do 100% policies incorporate grid considerations, such as reliability? 
  • What market structures are necessary for this transition?

Moderator: 

Debbie Lew 

Speakers: 

John Moore, Director, Sustainable FERC Project, Climate & Clean Energy Program, NRDC

Armond Cohen, Executive Director, Clean Air Task Force

W. Mason Emnett, VP, Competitive Market Policy, Exelon Corporation

4:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Beyond Retirements: How Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage Can Save Ratepayers Money

(Subcommittee on Clean Coal and Carbon Management)

Among the most important responsibilities of State energy regulators is overseeing long-term energy planning. Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) has emerged as a valuable tool to extend the lifespans of fossil fueled generators, cutting CO2 emissions while enabling the continued delivery of affordable and reliable baseload power. However, regulators need accurate information about the costs and benefits of various CCUS retrofits compared to other investments in order to make decisions in ratepayers’ best interest. Exciting developments in carbon capture for gas-fired power, CO2 utilization pathways, pre- and post-combustion applications, and advances in solvent and membrane design are part of a growing set of CCUS options for fossil generation. This panel will draw on the public and private sector experience of CCUS experts to improve State regulators’ familiarity with the growing range of options available for legacy fossil generation beyond retirement and replacement.

Moderator: 

Hon. Jeremy Oden, Alabama

Speakers: 

The Honorable Charles McConnell, Assistant Secretary of Fossil Energy (2011 - 2013) and Director, Center for Carbon Management in Energy at the University of Houston

Mike Nasi, Partner, Jackson Walker LLP

Paul Bailey, Chief Policy Officer, American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity / America's Power

Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 7 & 8

10:45 a.m. - 11: 45 a.m.

Business Meeting

Introductions and state action discussion

Roundtable exchange on future committee planning

Resolutions

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

100% Clean Energy: What Comes Next for Regulators?

Joint Panel with the Committee on Electricity

More and more States, cities, utilities, and corporations are passing laws and setting targets and goals for achieving "100%" clean, carbon-free, or renewable energy as the long-term expectation for meeting electricity needs. This panel will seek to describe the trend and begin to explore implications for regulators, including:

  • Where and why is this trend occurring?
  • What are the common elements and differences across the "100%" goals and policies?
  • How do the policies consider and impact costs, rate regulation and regulatory process?

Moderator:

Leia Guccione, Principal, Electricity Program, Rocky Mountain Institute

Speakers:

Hon. James Griffin, Hawaii

Jeff Lyng, Director of Energy and Environmental Policy, Xcel Energy Colorado

Sandra Mattavous-Frye  People's Counsel, DC Office of the People’s Counsel

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

100% Clean Energy: What Comes Next for Markets and the Grid?

Joint Panel with the Committee on Electricity

Many States have developed aggressive targets for renewable and carbon-free energy resource procurement while retiring legacy generation. This panel will begin to explore implications for markets and the grid, including:

  • What are the challenges for States, cities, and utilities getting to 100%?
  • How do solutions vary across regions, resources, and regulatory and market structures?
  • To what extent do 100% policies incorporate grid considerations, such as reliability? 
  • What market structures are necessary for this transition?

Moderator: 

Debbie Lew 

Speakers: 

Armond Cohen, Executive Director, Clean Air Task Force

W. Mason Emnett, Vice President, Competitive Market Policy, Exelon Corporation

John Moore, Director, Sustainable FERC Project, Climate & Clean Energy Program, NRDC

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Revisiting Paradigms for Decision-Making About Customer Side Resources

To take full advantage of energy efficiency, demand response, and other distributed and behind the meter resources, states and Commissions need to revisit and update their resource evaluation assumptions, methodologies, and practices. Traditional screening tests presented in the California Standard Practice Manual may not capture the range of costs and benefits that are important to a particular jurisdiction, resulting in under investment in efficiency and demand side resources. Often, different standards are used to determine “cost-effectiveness” for different resources or in different dockets. For example, some states use a different standard for screening costs and benefits in an Integrated Resource Planning process versus energy efficiency planning. This panel will explore how cost-effectiveness tests can be revised to be consistent with state’s energy policy goals, fully capture the benefits of all resources, and to fairly compare behind the meter and in front of the meter investments. The panel will also identify how different Commissions approaching this challenge?

Moderator: Hon. Mary Throne, Wyoming

Panelists:

Hon. Abigail Anthony, Rhode Island

Tanuj Deora, Vice President Market Development, Simple Energy

Julie Michals, Director of Clean Energy Valuation, E4TheFuture

Deborah Reynolds, Assistant Director, Conservation and Energy Planning, Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission

Committee on Gas

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4

10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

The State of U.S. Natural Gas Infrastructure from a Regulatory Perspective

Recent events and policy discussions have brought the complexities of natural gas infrastructure to the forefront. In fact, the Northeast has been grappling with infrastructure constraints raising reliability concerns while trying to find sensible innovative solutions that can be supported by sound economic regulatory decisionmaking. This roundtable panel will be led by a Commissioner team seeking to discuss natural gas infrastructure with a combination of expert representatives from labor unions, utilities, consumer groups, and other stakeholders. Each panelist will offer some personal insights into the current state of affairs and where we may go from here. The panel will address a variety of topics including, but not limited to: 

1. Regulatory policies that impact infrastructure development,

2. Appropriate state energy planning that incorporates their renewable energy goals,

3. Consumer impacts on infrastructure from other policy rollouts such as electrification,

4. Studies and economic analyses of grid modernization efforts, and

5. Sound customer engagement practices. 

Co-moderators:

Hon. Greer J. Gillis, District of Columbia

Hon. Marion Gold, Rhode Island

Hon. Dianne Solomon, New Jersey

Panelists:

Asim Haque, Commissioner Emeritus, Executive Director for Strategic Policy and External Affairs, PJM Interconnection

Erin Hutson, Director of Corporate Affairs, Laborers' International Union of North America

John O’Brien, Executive Vice President of Strategy and Public Affairs, WGL

Jonathan Schrag, Deputy Administrator, Division of Public Utilities and Carriers, Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission

Lori Traweek, COO, American Gas Association

Dena Wiggins, President and CEO, Natural Gas Supply Association 

1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

Finding Clean Energy Solutions for Low and Moderate Income (LMI) Communities: The Crucial Role of Policymakers in Closing the LMI Energy Technology Gap and Listening to the Consumer Voice 

Part 1 of 2

This panel will help examine how to protect low and moderate  income (LMI) households from potential adverse consequences of new technologies. No one can benefit from energy savings more than LMI customers, who often pay a much higher portion of their income for energy than middle- and high-income consumers. LMI communities and consumers can be subject to challenges when trying to access new technologies and examine what are the technologies true economic benefits.

Regulators grapple with the proper role of the regulated utility in serving the LMI community with new and emerging technologies. In fact, regulators have a long history of striving to ensure underserved communities get fair access to and are afforded the full benefits of the energy grid regardless of economic wherewithal. This panel will explore best practices and lessons learned in these endeavors in seeking to increase the disproportionately low deployment of new and emerging technologies in the LMI community. The focus is on truly engaging in a dialogue on roles regulators can play in better serving this sector.

NOTE: This is a two-part panel discussion featuring opportunities for the panelists to showcase and demonstrate technology case studies and help foster partnerships across energy sectors to engage with the LMI community. 

Co-moderators: 

Hon. Maida Coleman, Missouri

Hon. Sadzi Oliva, Illinois

Panelists: 

Joseph Dominguez, CEO, COmEd

Joe Hampton, President, Spire

Sandra Mattavous-Frye, People's Counsel, District of Columbia Office of the People's Counsel

Jerrold Oppenheim, President and Founder, Democracy and Regulation

Judith Schwartz, President and Founder, To the Point

Suzanne Sitherwood, CEO, Spire Energy

2:45 - 3:45 p.m.

Finding Clean Energy Solutions for Low-Moderate Income (LMI) Communities: The Crucial Role of Policymakers in Closing the LMI Energy Technology Gap and Listening to the Consumer Voice

Part 2 of 2

This panel will help examine how to protect low and moderate  income (LMI) households from potential adverse consequences of new technologies. No one can benefit from energy savings more than LMI customers, who often pay a much higher portion of their income for energy than middle- and high-income consumers. LMI communities and consumers can be subject to challenges when trying to access new technologies and examine what are the technologies true economic benefits.

Regulators grapple with the proper role of the regulated utility in serving the LMI community with new and emerging technologies. In fact, regulators have a long history of striving to ensure underserved communities get fair access to and are afforded the full benefits of the energy grid regardless of economic wherewithal. This panel will explore best practices and lessons learned in these endeavors in seeking to increase the disproportionately low deployment of new and emerging technologies in the LMI community. The focus is on truly engaging in a dialogue on roles regulators can play in better serving this sector.

NOTE: This is a two-part panel discussion featuring opportunities for the panelists to showcase and demonstrate technology case studies and help foster partnerships across energy sectors to engage with the LMI community. 

Co-moderators: 

Hon. Maida Coleman, Missouri

Hon. Sadzi Oliva, Illinois

Panelists: 

Corey Capasso, Founder and CEO, Urbint

Joseph Dominguez, CEO, COmEd

Joe Hampton, President, Spire

Sandra Mattavous-Frye, People's Counsel, District of Columbia Office of the People's Counsel

Jerrold Oppenheim, President and Founder, Democracy and Regulation

Judith Schwartz, President and Founder, To the Point

4:00 - 5:00 p.m.

The Affordability Challenge – Customer Assistance Programs (CAP) 

Joint with the Committee on Water and Committee on Consumers and the Public Interest

Despite water service’s historic undervaluation, some customers still struggle to afford water. Affordability issues are likely to rise to the forefront as costs increase to address critical infrastructure replacement and safe water quality requirements. This panel will examine affordability policies such as low-income tariffs along with any issues that impede such policies from being implemented.

Moderator: TBA 

Panelists:

Larry Dickerman, Senior Director Public Policy, Landis + Gyr

Jeff Hughes, Teaching Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Additional panelists TBA

Committee on Telecommunications

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 1 & 2

10:45-11:45 a.m.

Thinking Outside the Box - Part 2

In Part 1 at the Committee's February meeting, we heard how RLECs and rural electric cooperatives are using new technology and service opportunities to provide broadband to new locations throughout America. Today in Part 2 we will hear from other types of service providers who are utilizing their own new technologies to edge into providing service in rural and urban locations which have been left behind in broadband buildout. It's clear that no singular technology or type of company can fill every broadband gap throughout the country. It's going to take thinking outside of a lot of different boxes to solve this problem!

Moderator:

Hon. Chris Nelson, South Dakota

Panelists: 

Claude Aiken, President & CEO, WISPA

Stacey Parker, Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, Comcast

Andrew Curley, Director of Government Relations, Midco

Jerry Whisenhunt, General Manager, Pine Telephone Company

1:30-2:30 p.m.

Huawei - Understanding the Intersection of the Trade War, Tradecraft, and the Telecommunications Network

Huawei equipment has been blacklisted. This panel will discuss the federal ban on Huawei equipment, cost of rip and replace, and the impact to the rural telecommunications networks. Join us as we discuss the motivation for the ban, the short and long term consequences to rural telecommunications networks, the US trade war with China, and what it will mean to consumers.

Moderator:

Hon. Crystal Rhoades, Nebraska

Panelists: 

Claude Aiken, President & CEO, WISPA

Carri Bennet, General Counsel, Rural Wireless Association

David Bergmann, Assistant Consumers' Counsel, Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel

Andrew Lipman, Lipman, MORGAN, LEWIS & BOCKIUS, LLP, Legal Counsel for Huawei

2:45-3:00 p.m. Networking Break
2:45-3:45 p.m.

How the Networks of the Future Will Impact How We Live, Learn, Work and Play

5G wireless and 10G wired networks both promise to unleash a new era of broadband connectivity, service delivery and applications, with low latency and lightning fast speeds.  They enable smarter connected communities, better healthcare and education, virtual and augmented reality and more.  As these next-generation networks are deployed and the "Internet of Things" becomes a reality, how does policy keep up with tech innovation?  What steps are policy makers taking to incent deployment and break down barriers.  Hear the latest on State and federal activity including updates on efforts by Congress, the FCC and the States to promote faster broadband deployment while avoiding the creation of digital deserts.

Moderator:

Hon. Karen Charles Peterson, Massachusetts

Panelists: 

Rick Cimerman, VP External & State Affairs, NCTA 

Ben Aron, Director, State Regulatory & External Affairs, CTIA

4:00-5:00 p.m.

Broadband Mapping - The What and the Why Today, and the How of Improving for the Future

A great deal of effort is being made to map broadband coverage across the United States, but so far the results have been mixed.  This panel will look at the challenges and opportunities in the mapping process, including answering these three questions:

1) What has been done and how accurately?

2) Why does correct mapping matter to consumers and States

3) How can we improve our mapping efforts?

Moderator:

Hon. Sarah Hofmann, Vermont

Panelists:

Corey Chase, Telecommunications Infrastructure Specialist, Vermont Department of Public Service

Lynn Follansbee, VP Policy & Advocacy, US Telecom

Steve Morris, VP and Deputy General Counsel NCTA – The Internet & Television Association

Committee on Water

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 9 & 10

10:45 a.m.-11:45 a.m. 

Business Meeting

11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Lunch
1:30 p.m.-2:30p.m.

Asset Management Best Practices and Water Quality Accountability

Water infrastructure asset management is essential to ensuring the longevity of infrastructure and the safety and reliability of water service.  In recognition of the importance of adequate asset management, some states have begun to implement policies to ensure that all water systems, regardless of ownership structure, are effectivley managing their infrastructure.  NARUC recently passed a resolution on the issue, and states like New Jersey have implemented laws that require water systems to "create and implement an asset management plan designed to inspect, maintain, repair and renew its infrastructure."  This panel will examine such approaches and discuss potenital benefits and challenges related to asset management.

Moderator:

Hon. David Ober, Indiana

Panelists:

James Chelius, Engineering Director, American Water 

Justin Kauffman, Director of Asset Management, Aqua America

Evan Kirk, Project Director, Environmental Finance Center, UNC School of Government

David Rubin, Aclara

 

2:30 p.m. -2:45 p.m. Networking Break
2:45 p.m. -3:45 p.m.

Small Systems and Cybersecurity

Small water systems may not have the same resources to invest in elaborate cyber security protections as larger companies, but ensuring that their data and systems are safe is equally important.  Panelists from small systems will discuss how their utility has conquered this issue and share best practices for other small utilities. 

Moderator:

Hon. Brad Johnson, Montana

Panelists:

Jay Fusco, Connecticut Water Service, Inc.

John Lucas, Citizens Energy Group

TBA - Arcadis

 

3:45 p.m. -4:00 p.m. Networking Break
4:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Joint with Committee on Consumers and the Public Interest and Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment

Staff Subcommittee on Pipeline Safety

(Closed Meeting)

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Room 207

Agenda will be distributed at the meeting.

Subcommittee on Supplier and Workforce Diversity

1:30-3:45 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4

 

 

Networking Break

2:30-2:45 p.m. • Foyer

Networking Break

3:45-4:00 p.m. • Foyer

Subcommittee on Clean Coal and Carbon Management

4:00-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 6

 

Joint with Committee on Electricity

Commission Staff Power Hour

(Commission Staff/Red Tags Only)

5:15-6:15 p.m. • Griffin Hall

MACRUC Regional Meeting

(Invitees Only)

5:15-6:00 p.m. • Room 201

MARC Regional Meeting

(Invitees Only)

5:15-6:00 p.m. • Room 204

SEARUC Regional Meeting

(Invitees Only)

5:15-6:00 p.m. • Room 205

Western Regional Meeting

(Invitees Only)

5:15-6:00 p.m. • Room 202

Tuesday

Registration Open

8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m. • Foyer

General Session

9:00-10:15 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 5

 

Exploring Opportunities: What is in the Realm of the Possible?

Utility regulation is all about balance. Are current models of utility regulation in need of fine tuning—or even a complete overhaul? This multi-staged panel begins with experts in the gas, water, electricity, and telecommunications sectors who’ll give Ted-talk style updates on innovation and the future of each sector. The second part is a moderated candid conversation on ratemaking, exploring key issues raised by speaker with probing analysis and examples of successful and unsuccessful attempts at transformation.

This session will cover important questions such as:

  • Is current rate making in step with the evolving utility sector?
  • How can we determine which rate mechanisms work best?
  • What is the current status of carbon capture and sequestration?
  • How significant is the implementation of 5G in telecom?
  • What are the first steps in shifting the regulatory model?
  • How can we assess success?
  • How can new approaches to rate making affect issues such as grid modernization and cybersecurity?

Moderator: Hon. Sarah Hofmann, Vermont

Presenters:

Warner Baxter, Chairman, President and CEO, Ameren Corporation

Senator Brandt Hershman, Indiana. Currently Of Counsel at Barnes & Thornburg

Frank Macchiarola, Vice President, American Petroleum Institute

David Stanton, CEO, SUEZ North America's Utility Holdings

 

Panel Discussion:

Paula M. Carmody, People's Counsel, Maryland Office of People's Counsel
Travis Kavulla, Director, Energy, R Street Institute

Jim Richardson, Chief Energy Policy Advisor, Landis+Gyr

 

Networking Break

10:15-10:45 a.m. • Foyer

Committee on Consumers and the Public Interest

(Joint Meetings)

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Room TBD

 

 

Committee on Electricity

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 6

10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

Making DERs Cybersecure:  Vulnerabilities, Standards, and Requirements of Interconnecting DERs to the Grid

(Joint with Committee on Critical Infrastructure)

With the growth of DERs on the grid expected to continue, it is important to ensure that all distributed generation and storage resources added to the grid are secure from external and equipment-based vulnerabilities.  Panelists will discuss how to assess specific vulnerabilities caused by increasing DER interconnections to the grid and ways to ensure DER security. 

Moderators:

Hon. Judith Williams Jagdmann, Virginia

Hon. Gladys Brown Dutrieuille, Pennsylvania 

Speakers:

Tobias Whitney, Technical Executive, EPRI

Danish Saleem, DER Cybersecurity Standards Lead, NREL

Colleen Glenn, Control Systems Cyber Security Analyst, Idaho National Lab

Jake Gentle, Senior Power Systems Engineer, Idaho National Lab  

 

1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

Business Meeting with Remarks by:

John Bear, CEO, MISO

2:45 - 3:45 p.m.

Commissions’ Role Implementing the New Distributed Energy Resource Standard (IEEE 1547-2018)

As more distributed energy resources (DERs), like solar and storage, interconnect with the utility distribution grids, it is important that both the DERs and the grids are capable of safe and reliable operations.  IEEE 1547 is a foundational, technology neutral standard for the interconnection and interoperability of DERs that, when adopted at the State level, provides commissions and utilities with the framework and tools to ensure safe and reliable interconnection and operation of DERs in distribution systems.  IEEE 1547 underwent a substantive update in 2018 to address the challenges of increasing levels of DERs (including potential impacts to regional grids) and the capabilities of changing technologies (including advanced inverters).  This session will outline the importance of adopting the newly updated IEEE 1547, regardless of the current levels of DERs in your state, while illustrating options to ease implementation of the standard.

Moderator: 

Hon. Matthew Schuerger, Minnesota 

Panelists: 

David Narang, Section Manager, Applied Power Systems - Distributed Energy Systems Integration Group, NREL 

Devin Van Zandt, Technical Executive, EPRI

Sara Baldwin, VP, Regulatory, IREC

4:00 - 5:15 p.m.

The State of Nuclear Waste Transportation and Best Practices across the Country

(Subcommittee on Nuclear Issues - Waste Disposal)

 

The transportation of nuclear waste is an important issue facing the US. As nuclear plants are decommissioned and as operating plants continue to produce more waste, the country needs safe and efficient means of moving the waste to interim or permanent storage facilities. This panel will reflect on the history and current status of nuclear waste transportation along with best practices learned by experts in the industry.

Moderator:

Hon. Anthony O'Donnell, Maryland 

Panelists:

Dr. Kelly Horn Section Head, Environmental Management, Division of Nuclear Safety, Illinois Emergency Management Agency

Steven Edwards, Manager, Spent Fuel Management, Duke Energy 

Pamela Gorman Prochaska, Director, Nuclear Regulatory Policy & Strategy, Xcel Energy 

Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 7 & 8

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

State Journeys in NEM and DER Rate Reform: A Long and Winding Road

NEM and DER rate reforms are underway in many, many states. This panel provides a high-level summary of those actions across the country, and takes a deep-dive look into how those issues are being addressed in key states. The session explores the sets of major decisions that Commissions are being asked to make about next-generation tariffs for DER, and asks the state representatives to tell us the most important lessons they have learned through their efforts to date.

Co-Moderators:

Hon. Michael Richard, Maryland 

Hon. Lillian Mateo-Santos, Puerto Rico 

Panelists:

Hon. Joseph Fiordaliso, New Jersey

Hon. David Ober, Indiana

Hon. Kimberly O'Guinn, Arkansas

Tom Stanton, Principal Researcher for Energy and Environment, National Regulatory Research Institute

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Creative Momentum Class for Today and Tomorrow: DERs are Changing Everything

Got your crystal ball? Rapid advances in consumer technology and shifting consumer preferences are changing the kinds of grid services and product offerings that regulated utilities can and will be offering their customers. These changes are converging with public policy goals targeting clean energy, including decarbonization and its close cousin beneficial electricification. These broad trends of decentralization, connectivity, and automation are poised to fundamentally change the characteristics of utility industries. How might state commissions move forward into this new terrain? How are utilities assessing the paths that lie before them? Are there hidden roadblocks that must be addressed?  How have different states navigated such decisions?

Co-Moderators:

Hon. Lillian Mateo-Santos, Puerto Rico

Hon. Michael Richard, Maryland 

Panelists:

Cameron Brooks, President, Tolerable Planet Enterprises

Michael Delaney, Executive Director Regulatory Affairs and Policy, Consumers Energy, Co.

Anne Hoskins, Chief Policy Officer, Sunrun, Inc.

Andy Satchwell, Assistant Leader: Electricity Markets & Policy Group, Lawrence-Berkeley National Laboratory
2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

There’s a Major Change Headed Our Way: Forecasting DERs for Planning Purposes

As more attention moves to the distribution grid and the role that distributed energy resources (DERs) can play in meeting customers’ energy needs, it is imperative for utilities to plan for those resources---many of which will be installed without the kind of centralized planning and control typical for integrated resource planning (IRP)-style resources. Planning for DERs (often through distribution system planning [DSP] or integrated distribution planning [IDP]) includes predicting where the resources will be located, forecasting which kinds of resources will be installed, and calculating load shapes of those resources. This type of forecasting is an evolving field, drawing upon market segmentation practices, predictive analytics, and advanced modeling supported by major computing power. This panel will share innovations in DER forecasting being developed and deployed to date, discussing the abilities and limitations of current approaches.

Moderator:

Hon. Jeffery Ackermann, Colorado

Panelists:

Juliet Homer, Senior Energy Research Engineer, Energy Policy and Economics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Kevin Kushman, President, Integral Analytics, Inc.

Patrick McCoy, Distributed Energy Strategy, Grid Strategy and Operations, Sacramento Municipal Utility District

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Bringing the Renewable Heat: How Renewable Natural Gas Market Dynamics Are “Burning Up” Preconceived Notions of Traditional Regulatory Structures and Planning

Joint with the Committee on Gas

The speed at which RNG markets continue to move make it increasingly difficult to match with traditional notions of integrated resource planning, procurement, and cost effectiveness analytical frameworks. Not to mention, legislatures are warming up to the idea of renewable thermal portfolio standards, incentives, and carbon reduction strategies that continue to drive these markets into unchartered territory. This panel of experts will discuss how regulators can approach these market developments to ensure that their states are prepared to take advantage of this rapidly developing resource. Panelists will discuss strategies and tools that allow customers to take advantage of RNG offerings, including the developing voluntary and compliance markets.

Co-Moderators:

Hon. Megan Decker, Oregon

Hon. Mary-Anna Holden, New Jersey

Panelists:

Ben Gerber, Executive Director, Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System, Inc.

Zach Kravitz, Director, Rates & regulatory Affairs, NW Natural

Tanya Peacock, Public Policy and Planning Manager, Southern California Gas Company

McKenzie Schwartz, Analyst, Gas Utility of the Future, National Grid

Committee on Gas

10:45 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4

10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

Committee on Gas Business Meeting

Agenda: 

  • Introductions of new members of the Committee on Gas
  • Round robin pipeline safety exchange
  • Resolutions (if needed)

Co-moderators: 

Hon. Brandon Presley, Mississippi

Hon. Swain Whitfield, South Carolina

Panelists: 

Hon. Tonola Brown-Bland, North Carolina

Zoe Cadore, Policy Advisor, American Petroleum Institute

David Chislea, Manager, Gas Operations Section, Michigan Public Service Commission

Sherina Edwards, Commissioner Emeritus, Partner, Quarles & Brady, LLP

May Va Lor, Energy Researcher, Laborers' International Union of North America

Renewable Natural Gas Working Lab 

1:30 - 5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4

Under the auspices of the NARUC/DOE Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization Partnership (NGIMP), the Committee on Gas will be hosting a Renewable Natural Gas Workshop. The Workshop will explore Renewable Natural Gas (RNG), pipeline-quality gas that is fully interchangeable with conventional or fossil natural gas. This educational Workshop will include an introduction to RNG, how it is made, where it can be used, and the market outlook, case studies of RNG projects, and discussion on different regulatory, policy and technology considerations and approaches necessary when developing RNG projects and transporting RNG to end-use customers. 

This activity is open to all registered NARUC meeting attendees. Contact Kiera Zitelman, NARUC Senior Manager, at kzitelman@naruc.org for more information. 

1:30 - 1:45

Introductory Remarks and Orientation to RNG

Hon. Julie Brown, Florida

Dan LeFevers, Director, State & Consumer Programs, Gas Technology Institute

1:45 - 2:30

Understanding Real World Deployment of RNG through Case Studies 

As the RNG market continues to grow, this panel will explore the technical capability of renewable natural gas to meet market demand and will examine the potential role that RNG can play in meeting sustainability and emissions targets. The following panelists will discuss the growing market for RNG beyond just the transportation market and into direct use thermal applications. They will explore market decisions, various motivations to peruse RNG projects, RNG as a climate policy compliance tool, how buyers and sellers connect, and other questions.

Moderator: Hon. Paul Kjellander, Idaho

Panelists:  

Ryan Childress, Manager, Business Development, Dominion Energy

Blaine Collison, Senior Vice President, David Gardiner and Associates

Brian Jones, Senior Vice President, M.J. Bradley & Associates

Emily O'Connell, Director, Energy Markets Policy, American Gas Association

Jeff Stander, Senior Project Developer, Ameresco

2:45 - 3:45

Connecting the Dots between Supply and Demand: Integrating RNG into a Safe, Reliable, and Efficient Pipeline Network

Growing interest in RNG has led to questions for state regulators on how our current pipeline infrastructure may be affected by increasing RNG concentrations. Interconnecting RNG to the network requires coordination between project developers, utilities, and state regulators. This panel will explore issues related to RNG interconnection, including gas quality, integration, safety, and the efficient delivery of RNG to end users.

Moderators: 

Hon. D. Ethan Kimbrel, Illinois

Hon. Dianne Solomon, New Jersey

Panelists:  

Jay Hopper, Vice President of Business Development, Aria Energy

Stuart Nachmias, Vice President, Energy Policy & Regulatory Affairs, Con Edison

Jamie Ormond, Public Utilities Regulatory Analyst, Renewable Natural Gas, California Public Utilities Commission (invited)

Kristine Wiley, R&D Director, Gas Technology Institute

4:00 - 5:00

Bringing the Renewable Heat: How Renewable Natural Gas Market Dynamics Are “Burning Up” Preconceived Notions of Traditional Regulatory Structures and Planning

Joint panel with the Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment and the Committee on Water

The speed at which RNG markets continue to move make it increasingly difficult to match with traditional notions of integrated resource planning, procurement, and cost effectiveness analytical frameworks. Not to mention, legislatures are warming up to the idea of renewable thermal portfolio standards, incentives, and carbon reduction strategies that continue to drive these markets into unchartered territory. This panel of experts will discuss how regulators can approach these market developments to ensure that their states are prepared to take advantage of this rapidly developing resource. Panelists will discuss strategies and tools that allow customers to take advantage of RNG offerings, including the developing voluntary and compliance markets.  

Moderators: 

Hon. Megan Decker, Oregon

Hon. Mary-Anna Holden, New Jersey

Panelists:  

Ben Gerber, Executive Director, Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System, Inc.

Zach Kravitz, Director, Rates & regulatory Affairs, NW Natural

Tanya Peacock, Public Policy and Planning Manager, Southern California Gas Company

McKenzie Schwartz, Analyst, Gas Utility of the Future, National Grid

Committee on Telecommunications

Telecommunications

Tuesday, July 23

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Location: Grand Ballroom 1 & 2

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

CAF II Auction Results and the Upcoming RDOF Challenge

The FCC recently concluded its first widespread USF auction, awarding a relatively small tranche of approximately $150 million per year.  This initial auction, however, will soon be dwarfed by the FCC's "Rural Digital Opportunity Fund" auction, estimated at $2 billion per year and requiring minimum speeds of 25 Mbps/3 Mbps.  Moreover, while the CAF II Auction focused on areas that were largely unserved, it is expected that the RDOF Auction will also include areas served by price cap carriers that accepted over $9 billion in support of the past six years to deploy 10 Mbps/1 Mbps service.  This panel will provide an in-depth examination of the lessons learned from the CAF II Auction, as well as identify the new issues that will likely arise in the much larger, and more complicated RDOF auction system.  In addition, the panel will discuss implications for price cap ILECs that are overbuilt by the broadband networks of auction winners.

Moderator:

Hon. Dan Lipschultz, Minnesota

Panelists: 

Carol Mattey, Mattey Consulting LLC.

Joe Gillan, GIllan Associates

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Federalism and the Future of Telecommunications - What's Next for States

The state role with respect to universal service and telecommunications oversight continues to evolve.  There seems to be a growing recognition of the need to integrate or at least coordinate universal service and broadband programs and initiatives among the various federal agencies, but it is not clear that federal policy makers have yet recognized the efficiencies of greater state involvement and coordination with State programs seeking the same goal. At the same time, there are two appeals outstanding that have the potential to change the scope of state oversight pending now in the Courts – the FCC’s Internet Freedom Appeal and a pending request for Supreme Court review of a recent 8th Circuit decision, Charter v. Lange, expanding and arguably misapplying conflict preemption principles to bar state oversight of local phone services.  What do these cases and trends mean for state authority going forward? What does in mean if the Supreme Court does not grant certiorari to review the Charter decision?  What impact will a decision upholding the Internet Freedom decision have on State authority? What and where should State regulators focus their resources? This panel will offer some insight on  these and related questions on the ongoing role for state regulators.

Moderator:

Hon. Sarah Freeman, Indiana

Panelists:

Richard Berkley, Executive Director, New York's Utility Project

Brad Ramsay, General Counsel, NARUC

Michael Santorelli, Director, ACLP at New York Law School

Sana Sheikh, Senior Corporate Counsel, Granite Telecommunications

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. Networking Break
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m Business Meeting

Committee on Water

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 9 & 10

10:45am-11:45am

Safe Drinking Water Act Compliance

A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in February 2018 found that community water systems owned by regulated water companies are significantly less likely to violate the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) than water systems owned and run by local governments.  The study found that private ownership of a water system was “significantly associated with higher compliance” with the SDWA.  Panelists will address best practices and expectations for SDWA compliance

Moderator: TBA

Panelists:

Kyle Butts, Research Manager at Forward Observer

Cheryl Norton, President of Missouri American Water

Karen Stachowski, Assistant Attorney General at Consumer Advocate Unit of Tennessee Attorney General

11:45am - 1:15pm Lunch

1:30pm - 2:30pm

Extreme weather events and climate variation  What are the implications?

With the recent release of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, public attention is once again fixed on the importance of resilient infrastructure as it relates to implications of climate variability and extreme weather eventd.  Among other concerns, the report finds that our nation’s deteriorating water infrastructure exacerbates the climate risk faced by society and that the “quality and quantity of water available for use by people and ecosystems across the country are being affected by climate change, increasing risks and costs to agriculture, energy production, industry, recreation and the environment.”  Given these recent findings, it is essential that regulators get water policy right.  This panel will examine the report’s finding and discuss current approaches and policies to these concerns.

Moderator: 

Hon.  Comer "Randy" Randall, South Carolina

Panelists:

Suzanne Chiavari, Engineering Director, Treatment and Resiliency, American Water

Charles Davidson, New York Law School

Megan Levy, Local Energy Programs Manager, Wisconsin Office of Energy Innovation

Michael Mares, Vice President, California Operations, California Water Service Group

2:30pm - 2:45pm Networking Break
2:45pm - 3:45pm

Emerging Contaminants

Water quality considerations are under increased scrutiny as customer expectations continue to increase, contaminant testing technology advances and additional health impact studies becomes available.  Emerging contaminants such as Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) are one of the most reported-on issues in the water space.  Across the country, water utilities are detecting emerging contaminants and many are struggling to assure water quality.  States like Michigan have acted swiftly to establish cleanup rules for some PFAS and recently New Hampshire has proposed drinking water Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) with many other states poised to impose similar standards.  This panel will address emerging contaminants and mitigation approaches as well as potential costs to ensure compliance.

Moderator:

Hon. John "Jack" Betkoski, III, Connecticut

Panelists:

Robert Scott, Commissioner, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

David Spacht, Chief Financial Officer, Artesian Resources Corporation

Mark A. Vannoy, P.E., Technical Expert, ECT2

3:45pm - 4:00pm Networking Break
4:00pm - 5:00pm Joint with Committee on Gas and Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment

Staff Subcommittee on Pipeline Safety

(Closed Meeting)

10:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. • Room 207

Agenda will be distributed at the meeting.

Commissioner Emeritus Lunch

11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. • Room 314

Commissioner Business Lunch

11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 5

Networking Break

2:30-2:45 p.m. • Foyer

Networking Break

3:45-4:00 p.m. • Foyer

Wednesday

 

Registration Open

9:00-11:45 a.m. • Foyer

General Session

9:00-11:45 a.m. • Grand Ballroom 5

 

Taking Turns in the Driver’s Seat:
Who Should Push Toward the Finish Line?

This interactive session will focus on recent diversity trends within the utility industry, discuss how organizations are managing challenges and opportunities for supplier and workforce diversity, and identify best practices and lessons learned from organizations nationwide that have effectively “achieved” diversity among their suppliers and workforce. Panelists will discuss their experience with implementing policies. They will explore what more can be done. Participants will suggest who should take the lead — ‘get out of the pit, into the driver’s seat and onto the track’ — to achieve the inclusive and diverse future that we all see ahead of us.

Moderator: Hon. Sadzi Oliva, Illinois

Participants:

Hon. Nick Wagner, Iowa

Hon. Willie Phillips, District of Columbia

Paula Glover, CEO, American Association of Blacks in Energy

Anne Pramaggiore, CEO, Exelon Utilities

Susan Story, CEO, American Water

 

Family Feud is Coming to NARUC

We are putting a NARUC twist on this all-time favorite game show. You won’t want to miss our ‘family of commissioners’ and our ‘family of stakeholders’ compete to win absolutely nothing but bragging rights. Our ‘families’ will be guessing the most popular responses to survey questions related to utility regulation, based on responses provided by NARUC attendees.

Host: Hon. Nick Wagner, Iowa

Commissioner Family:

Hon. Sarah Hoffman, Vermont

Hon. Judy Jagdmann, Virginia

Hon. Paul Kjellander, Idaho

Hon. Kim O'Guinn, Arkansas

Hon. Brandon Presley, Mississippi

 

Stakeholder Family:

Kevin Gunn, Principal, Paladin Energy Strategies

Asim Z. Haque, Executive Director of Strategic Policy and External Affairs, PJM Interconnection 

Phil Moeller, Executive Vice President Regulatory Affairs, EEI

Robert Powelson, Executive Director, NAWC

Board of Directors Meeting

11:45 a.m.-3:00 p.m. • Grand Ballroom 3 & 4