Energy Resources and the Environment

This agenda is subject to change.

Energy Resources and the Environment

Sunday, November 12

9:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Location: Key 8
9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Joint with Staff Subcommittees on Electricity and Electric Reliability

Next Level Demand Response

Demand Response (DR) programs are now familiar offerings in electric utilities nationwide, with many programs offering to place load control technologies like smart thermostats in customers’ homes and businesses to control loads and reduce peak demands. Is there room for DR programs to also provide other grid support services by using energy storage? This panel will explore different types of Storage DR programs, such as the shared ownership model in Vermont, contracts for peak demand reductions in New York and California, and the "reverse DR" pilot in Arizona. Discussions will focus on how customers and utilities are sharing dispatch control of their storage systems, what kinds of customer-specific benefits are realized by these programs, and whether the greater distribution grid is indeed benefiting from this next-generation form of DR. Additionally, the panel will explore how these DR programs may be transferrable to other types of DER technologies, beyond energy storage.

Moderator: Wally Nixon, Commissioner’s Legal Advisor, Arkansas Public Service Commission

Panelists:

Robert Dostis, Vice President, Stakeholder Relations and New Products, Green Mountain Power

Ted Ko, Director of Policy, Stem

Virginia Lacy, Principle, Rocky Mountain Institute

Damei Jack, Manager of Targeted Demand Management Programs, Con Edison

Kent Walter, Manager of Customer Technology, Arizona Public Service

10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. 

Joint with Staff Subcommittee on Water

Voluntary Climate Action Practices: Implications for Utilities and Commissions

With the recent hiatus in U.S. federal actions on climate change, more attention is focused on States; local governments; large corporate customers; markets affecting smaller customers; and the many actions they are taking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, mitigate future problems, and better adapt to climate instability and climate extremes. This panel summarizes several of the most impactful voluntary climate actions, and contemplates how those actions at each level might affect regulated utilities. Included are representatives from efforts that are focused on changes in energy and water use policies and practices.

Moderator: Jon Kucskar, Senior Advisor to the Maryland Public Service Commission

Panelists:

James Bradbury, Mitigation Program Director, Georgetown Climate Center

Adella Crozier, Director of Regulatory Affairs, DTE Energy

Sue Gander, Director, Environment, Energy & Transportation Division,
National Governors Association

Alice Kennedy, Deputy Commissioner, Division of Green, Healthy and Sustainable Homes, City of Baltimore

Monday, November 13

9:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Location: Key 12
9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Is it Time for TOU rates?

There has long been tension around time of use (TOU) rates. On one hand TOU is a rate structure that may help reduce peak loads, lower electricity bills, enable emissions reductions, and encourage renewable energy deployment. On the other hand, TOU rates may harm customers who lack flexibility to shift energy use times, cannot afford home technologies that facilitate load-shifting, or cannot afford unpredictability on a bill, and may reduce the amount of offset credits for rooftop solar customers that utilize net metering. This panel will explore the new potential for broader consideration of this rate design, as well as a process for doing so that can ease longstanding tensions between utilities and customers. This year, a group of electricity rate experts representing consumer, low-income, and clean energy advocacy perspectives collaborated on a joint paper detailing common ground on TOU rates to guide utilities commissions on the matter and explored the timely question: if done carefully, should the implementation of TOU rates be on the rise?

Moderator: Hon. Andrew Place, Pennsylvania

Panelists:

Ashley Brown, Executive Director, Harvard Electricity Policy Group

Rick Gilliam, Program Director, DG Regulatory Policy, Vote Solar

Marcel Hawiger, Staff Attorney, The Utility Reform Network

Douglas Jester, Principal, 5 Lakes Energy

Ellen Zuckerman, Senior Consultant, Schlegel & Associates 

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Business Meeting

Introductions: Hon. Nancy Lange, Minnesota and Hon: Carla Peterman, California

Commissioner Roundtable: This roundtable will continue the TOU discussion started in ERE's morning session.  Committee Members will share the rate design changes being considering in their states, and their response to the TOU panel discussion.

Resolutions

Research Updates:  Ron Edelstein, GTI; Barbara Tyran, EPRI; and Tom Stanton, NRRI.

Mary Kilmarx Award

Tuesday, November 14

Location: Key 12
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. A5

From the Joneses to the Jetsons! Smart Communities and Infrastructure

If communities are getting “smarter,” regulators must stay ahead of the curve. Utilities are investing in a smarter electric grid that benefits customers and are working on projects in ‘smart communities’ to establish programs to bring more resilient and sustainable options to customers. As the smart technologies advance, industry, stakeholders, regulators, and policymakers should be on the same page.

Attendees will participate in a dynamic discussion that will address:

  • How 'smart communities' are defined and how the emerging technologies will affect utility customers.
  • What regulators may see in future proceedings and what investments utilities are making.
  • Stakeholder perspectives on how ratepayers may be affected, along with privacy and cyber concerns.
  • How financing these new programs will affect ratepayers in the near and far terms.
  • Benchmarks and metrics to assess performance.

 

Moderator: Hon. Odogwu Linton, Maryland

Participants:

Donna Cooper, President, Pepco Region for PHI

Brigham A. McCown, Nouveau, Inc

Michael Murray, President, Mission:data

David Owens, Retired Executive Vice President, Edison Electric Institute

Russ Vanos, VP Global Software, Services & Smart Cities, ITRON

Location: Key 12
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. A5

From the Joneses to the Jetsons! Smart Communities and Infrastructure

If communities are getting “smarter,” regulators must stay ahead of the curve. Utilities are investing in a smarter electric grid that benefits customers and are working on projects in ‘smart communities’ to establish programs to bring more resilient and sustainable options to customers. As the smart technologies advance, industry, stakeholders, regulators, and policymakers should be on the same page.

Attendees will participate in a dynamic discussion that will address:

  • How 'smart communities' are defined and how the emerging technologies will affect utility customers.
  • What regulators may see in future proceedings and what investments utilities are making.
  • Stakeholder perspectives on how ratepayers may be affected, along with privacy and cyber concerns.
  • How financing these new programs will affect ratepayers in the near and far terms.
  • Benchmarks and metrics to assess performance.

 

Moderator: Hon. Odogwu Linton, Maryland

Participants:

Donna Cooper, President, Pepco Region for PHI

Brigham A. McCown, Nouveau, Inc

Michael Murray, President, Mission:data

David Owens, Retired Executive Vice President, Edison Electric Institute

Russ Vanos, VP Global Software, Services & Smart Cities, ITRON

Location: Key 7
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. B5

Myth Busters... Family Feud Style 

Reliability for wind and microgrids have been put to the test! Wind has earned a reputation for beating to its own drum – but does that make it unreliable from an operator’s perspective? Is a low or no carbon grid possible? Are microgrids a reliability silver bullet? This session will explore some of the research and experiences people in the industry have to share about familiar antidotes to today’s grid issues. Some say that wind is intermittent and therefore unreliable, while an operator may know something different. Some say that a low or no carbon grid is absolutely possible and that we should get a move on it already. Is that reality and what do others have to say about it? Microgrids might be a perfect fit for one campus, but should they be adopted everywhere? This session will break down some of the common, general questions and themes we are hearing.

Welcome to Family Feud. Our goal is to make this educational and entertaining. See our panelists go head to head to guess the top answer from a survey question. The winner gets to pass or play, stake their claim first, or wait and rebut the others' claim. We'll then closeout the board by panelists guessing the rest of the survey answers. Three strikes and the other team can steal the board with a correct guess! Plan to join us for a fun and informative discussion. The winners won't get to play fast money, but they'll have NARUC bragging rights.

Moderator: Hon. Nick Wagner, Iowa

Participants:

Hon. Michael Huebsch, Wisconsin

Rob Gramlich, President, Grid Strategies, LLC 

Bruce Rew, Vice President, Operations, Southwest Power Pool, Inc. 

Susan L. Satter, Public Utilities Counsel, Office of Attorney General Lisa Madigan, Illinois 

Matthew Wald, Senior Communications Advisor, Nuclear Energy Institute

Don Wingate, Vice President –  Utility Sales, Strategic Customers and Microgrid Solutions, Schneider Electric